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Archive for the ‘Introspection’ Category

Friends are a life's riches

Nothing is more important than time, time spent with people whom you have spent time with one way or another.

In good times and bad, you know they are there to lend a hand, or an ear.

Time may be the best present you can ever give a friend. In whatever season.

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Mothers ought to…

1. Be calm.

2. Be assertive.

3. Be responsible.

4. Be fair.

5. Be true.

6. Be open.

7. Be trusting.

8. Be smart.

9. Be kind.

And most of all…

10. Be there.

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Has anyone considered writing as a life skill? Has anyone seen that writing can provide us a first step toward solving a problem?

Collecting your thoughts at the end of the day and writing them down helps you see clearly the clutter from the order. Your awareness is heightened by paying homage to your thoughts and feelings by writing them down.

Not the writing of the Reading-Writing-aRithmetic kind, the one required of us to learn when we were in school. But writing writing. The one that gives us the space to express, say what we want, send the message we want, greet, ask, request, command, direct, inform, and many more. All these can be seen in many forms–letters, memos, banners, posters, Facebook status, blogs, etc.

Letter-writing is the nearest to a life skill. Whether handwritten, emailed, or typed in Word and printed with desk jet, letters can provide us a first step toward problem-solving.

Here are some simple situations that make writing a life skill:

1.  Writing your landlord that you want to discontinue renting his apartment because security is an issue.

2. Writing to apply for a college scholarship, or to enroll to take up masters, or to apply for a job.

3.  Writing to ask for condonation of an interest on a loan.

4.  Writing to make amends with a friend who lives in a distant place.

5.  Writing a love letter.

Apart from bathing, writing should also be a life skill.

There is a great deal of life situations that need us to write. And that is probably the reason why we were taught composition in school–in Filipino or in English–in the first place. And that is probably the reason why not being able to write a decent paragraph when you are a high school or a college graduate is a dismay to the job interviewee or to a boss.

And why not? The person that you are can be seen from the words you put out, whether written or said.

Writing as a life skill does not mean one should become an expert at it but be able to do it like bathing or cooking or doing the laundry or managing money.

Writing is as essential as talking, the written word as important as the spoken word.

Writing as a step to solving a problem therefore is a life skill.

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I have started “journaling.” I have voluntarily taken a mentor. His name is G. Lynn Nelson, who promotes creative journaling, through his Writing and Being book. He says journaling can heal your past, claim your present, and transform your future.

I believe the journal, the product of one’s journaling, is not an end that results in these effects; rather, it is process that liberates one from the leash of the past, that allows one to enjoy the now, and in so doing, charts a course that is life-changing.

"I often suggest to beginning journal keepers, "Let a journal find you." — G. Lynn Nelson, Writing and Being

I am a journaling newbie. I thought to do it one day, after feeling I should do so. I found a simple yellow ruled notebook, no-glare off-white pages, and Smyth-sewn which I thought would render a nice feeling to the writing.

After a few pages of Writing and Being, which I bought when I was about a few weeks into my journal, I found out it was to be my first step, find a journal, or what Mr. Nelson says, “Let a journal find you.” And I did—it was very affordable, far from the price of a Moleskin, but comparable in quality and look.

I learned that journaling is not the same as keeping a diary. [I will let Mr. Nelson tell you the difference. It’s a long story.] One thing I learned is that journaling is much more than listing down your activities and telling what happened. Journaling is far deeper than that, he says.

I thought to share with you some lines from my young journal of 27 days.

  1. What a day experiencing the fruits of hard-earned college diploma, the joy of extreme friendships, and the blessings of family.
  2. I realized writing is not an easy thing to do, as I imagine and always say it is.
  3. I remember my boo boo, not having taken a picture with her before she passed on.
  4. What happened today?
  5. Just a quiet walk with a loved one is a blessing.
  6. It is not good to preempt stress.
  7. My journal writing is my meditation.
  8. My frustration just went out the window.
  9. I am amazed by the sight of us all, together, and being and doing something together.
  10. A relaxing day today; but I don’t remember the feelings.

Journaling makes me visit myself, or revisit, if you will. For me, it’s good for the soul.

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